Playwrites News Bin: NYC Theater


NYT > Theater
The Bard Hall Players, a theater company made up of Columbia University medical students, is marking its 50th season with a production of “Into the Woods.”

Marc Bamuthi Joseph’s dance-theater show considers racism, colonialism and aging as refracted through the world’s most popular sport.

Actors and playwrights describe how David Henry Hwang’s 1988 play inspired their work.

David Henry Hwang has reworked his gender-blurring, career-launching Tony-winning play to assure that it feels “resonant with the culture today.”

Lin-Manuel Miranda speaks to the man who has consistently remade the American musical over his 60-year career — and who is trying to surprise us one more time.

The Upright Citizens Brigade will be leaving its famed space in Chelsea and moving to a location on West 42nd Street by early December.

Works from the Belarus Free Theater and the Freedom Theater explore the drama of confronting authority.

Two productions that draw on the Bard: an “As You Like It” with echoes of the refugee crisis and a goofy musical based on “Measure for Measure.” In this case, fun wins.

The death of Michael Friedman, a much-admired composer and lyricist, has left friends and fellow artists asking if they could have done more to help him amid signs of trouble.

Previews, openings and some last-chance picks.

Ms. Darrieux’s career of sophisticated roles spanned indelible incarnations as ingénue, coquette, femme fatale and grande dame.

Ping Chong creates a deceptively warm multimedia production about a very cold place.

This spirited riff on the long-running HBO hit displays affection for its subject, tempered with a keen eye for its shortcomings.

Mr. Dotrice, who began acting in a P.O.W. camp, had a long career in movies, on TV and onstage, winning his Tony in “A Moon for the Misbegotten.”

Comedians in some Asian countries must have their scripts approved while finding creative ways to joke about sex and politics so as not to offend the government.

Bruce Springsteen has a triumphant night for his Broadway debut, but leaves his fans at the Hard Rock Cafe to party on their own.

Step onstage with James Thierrée and Compagnie du Hanneton as they return to the Brooklyn Academy of Music for the Next Wave Festival with “La Grenouille Avait Raison” (“The Toad Knew”).

The academy has long insisted that professional achievement is what counts, but now it stands at a precipice, and Harvey Weinstein could change everything.

A human rights festival slated for a church hall has moved to a new venue after archdiocese officials expressed their disapproval of some parts.

Heather Christian communes with — and possibly exorcises — the spirits of the dead in a truly one-of-a-kind performance piece

The designer Paula Scher talks about her artwork for a revival of the Thornton Wilder play at the Pasadena Playhouse.

The musical, about dueling cosmetics executives, will wrap up on Nov. 5.

Also the week of Oct. 15: Monteverdi’s groundbreaking “Orfeo” in Manhattan, and Mona Hatoum’s sly sculptures in Houston.

In a hybrid of concert and autobiography, Bruce Springsteen delivers a major statement about his life’s work — but also a major revision of it.